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Someone Stop This Merry-Go- Round; An Alcoholic Family in Crisis

March 26, 2017

Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round  by Alberta Sequeira

INTRODUCTION

Alcoholism is a disease that affects millions of people along with heart problems, diabetes, cancer, and drug addiction. We hear and read about different diseases that kill people every day and how they leave broken-hearted families behind.
Who is considered an alcoholic and what are they like in behavior? We all have our own personal conception about what a person has to do in order to be considered an alcoholic. Usually, they’re labeled as habitual drunks.
Most of us picture an alcoholic as a person, curled-up and passed out among the over-turned garbage cans and found on a hidden side-street between buildings or someone under a torn, grimy blanket sleeping on a park bench with a newspaper over their face and wearing ragged, filthy clothes looking as though they needed a hot, sudsy shower. In fact, a large percentage of the public automatically assumes it’s a man in this condition having the problem. Today, we realize that a woman could be the alcoholic in these situations. As the years pass, there is no special gender.
Our intellects come to the understanding and conclusion that the drinker has absolutely no desire to find a job or no wish to mingle with and contribute to society. We insist that many of them are living off the welfare system with no intention of bettering themselves. When we come in contact with the drinker, many of us lose patience with them or omit them completely in our conversations and social circles.
It’s more comfortable for us to pretend that they don’t exist. In other words, they’re not getting their act together to think and do things the way we believe they should.
Because our own lives are structured and orderly, we believe that we’re better than the alcoholic. We forget how blessed our families are to have jobs that pay well, three good meals a day on the table, independent lives, and the freedom to come and go as we like. This concept is what most people consider to be a healthy American life under normal living conditions.
The reality of an alcoholic’s life won’t hit us until we come in direct contact with a family member, friend, or a close acquaintance who’s struggling to combat this disease. Then we develop the need to understand fully and to gain the knowledge of what alcohol is doing to the alcoholic and the people around them.
Once the abuser’s actions start to affect our lives, we suddenly sit-up and open our eyes to what’s happening to the individual. The desire to help them is there because we love the person and can see that the disease has changed his or her personality, morals, and ambitions. The devastating fact hits us that alcohol is slowly killing our loved one.
The alcoholics themselves can become acutely aware that they are drowning in drink and still don’t feel the need or have the willpower to get help. For them, the battle to give up liquor has too many side effects, and it’s too hard to combat the habit, especially if this life-style has been going on for years.
It’s a struggle every day for an alcoholic to just get out of bed. Many spend their days sleeping. They skip meals because their appetite has disappeared, thereby causing more damage to their health because their bodies breakdown from lack of proper nutrition to keep them stable.
Many alcoholics who have tried to fight the disease don’t relish the unpleasant physical effects of going without a drink; instead, they give in and turn back to drinking. In their mind, taking a drink is the only way to stop the effects of withdrawal. They fear going to any public place, and the drinking imprisons them in their own home behind closed doors.
Their lives and minds are constantly in a confused state. Alcoholics live in uncertainty that immobilizes them. They find it hard to do anything for themselves or their families. All confidence disappears. They make up all kinds of stories in order to avoid doing anything that makes them uncomfortable.
Doctors’ appointments are cancelled because they fear what they may be told. Family events are ignored so they don’t have to hear about their behavior or their broken promises. They live in denial that they have any problem at all and believe they can stop drinking at any time.
Getting sober for an alcoholic means they’ll have to take the giant step of signing themselves into a detoxification center. There, they’ll experience what they feared: the shakes, being confined, and taking medicine that will make them feel worse before they get better. They’re subjected to answering personal, embarrassing questions and being cooped-up in a single room with strangers, whom they consider to be sicker than they are.
After weeks or months of drying out, they’re pushed into the outside world again to face the same problems that brought them there. Depending on circumstances, they’ll have to confront the people that they hurt, deal with job hunting, and return to having the responsibility of making family decisions. Some become paranoid, thinking that everyone is judging them and watching their every move to see if they slip. Some probably are being watched because the whole family becomes sick and confused from the disease.
If they don’t continue to seek professional counseling after being rehabilitated, join an AA group, or find a sponsor, most alcoholics go right back to the bottle, which is always there to comfort them with no condemnation.
Going back to drinking, or falling off the wagon as the expression goes, doesn’t mean that they want to—it means they’re sick. Alcoholism is a disease that is highly hereditary. It would be so much easier if drinking could be cured by simply taking a pill. The first step to recovery for the alcoholic is for him or her to want the help. No one can help them if they don’t want recovery.
Alcoholics have the same wants and dreams as the rest of us. There was a time when they held a job, had a marriage, brought up children, owned a home and a car, and had a social life with their friends and families. Now, they have become frightened human beings who have lost their dignity.
Alcoholism doesn’t happen overnight. The reality of their lives being out-of-control came when catastrophes started to happen all around them. Some drinkers are fortunate to be able to keep their lives fairly normal, but others don’t realize it’s a problem until they lose everything.
Society needs to stop looking at the millions of alcoholics as bums or low-class individuals who don’t want to better themselves. They have a disease that can reach the point of no return.
If a person has been drinking for years and wants to stop, the body may have reached the point where it needs the drink. The body craves it; then there’s no stopping.
Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round is based on the true story of my life living with and losing a husband to alcoholism. Slowly, our happy lives as a secure family started to fall to pieces at different stages. It seems completely incomprehensible to me now that I couldn’t see the signs of serious drinking from this uncontrollable disease.

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Truth in every page
By meme

I couldn’t put this book down. I have been unable to read a complete book for the last 8 years and this one I couldn’t put down. Not only is it an easy read but anyone who has been in an alcoholic marriage will find comfort in this. This is not a self help book, but it gives you the realization that someone else has felt exactly what you felt and you were not crazy.

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By Midwest Book Review

Alcoholism is not only destructive for the alcoholic, but his family as well. “Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round” tells the story of Alberta H. Sequeira, and how she slowly lost her husband to alcohol. Reflecting on her own views, what happens to her family, and how one man’s self-destruction proved to be more than only self, Sequeira has a life that many will sadly relate to, and will find comfort in. For those looking for strength from their own alcohol-driven problems, “Someone Stop This Merry-Go-Round” is a top pick.

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Purchase at www.amazon.com/author/albertasequeira

Addiction Conference

March 26, 2017

poster-patience with recovery

 

https://vendome.swoogo.com/shame-trauma-addiction-austin/Agenda?utm_campaign=Enews&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=49074190&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9Y4KzGSaH-LJdIS_MVh4hM1uM7z-mS6fJhVmlmQkSrZxz4tO2uMyBU8m1TwdwnMvdq3AaYJ9RAI8BD_oordvZ7WupSVJzO599MyYQUu_-kM57ZHmk&_hsmi=49074190

Location: Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 16, 2017 6 CEs
8:30 am – 4:00 pm
PC01 – Ethics – Client Autonomy and Professional Responsibility: Clinical Ethics in Mental Health Services (6.0 Ethicsc CE)
Michael A. Gillette, PhD

This highly interactive, case-based, full day seminar will provide attendees with an opportunity to discuss a variety of ethical issues related to mental health and addiction services. We will begin by reviewing a practical approach to ethical analysis that will help the attendees better manage ethical issues that they encounter in their professional lives.

Getting out of Denial

March 23, 2017

alcoholic

Alcohol ruined me financially and morally, broke my heart and the hearts of too many others. Even though it did this to me and it almost killed me and I haven’t touched a drop of it in seventeen years, sometimes I wonder if I could get away with drinking some now. I totally subscribe to the notion that alcoholism is a mental illness because thinking like that is clearly insane.

CRAIG FERGUSON, American on Purpose: The Improbable Adventures of an Unlikely Patriot

Authors Without Borders Interview

January 25, 2017

Writer’s Event

January 21, 2017

awb-olive-garden
Special Event
Authors Without Borders Presents:
EXPLORING NEW STRATEGIES
You are invited to attend a fun and informative AWB program for writers and aspiring writers:

W hen: Saturday, April 22nd 2017

Noon to 3pm

Where: John P. McKeon AMVETS Post #146

4 Hill Top St.

Dorchester, MA (617) 436-2991

Easy access from the Southeast Expressway, free parking available.

This event includes buffet and beverages, mingling with other writers, handouts, and your choice of one of the following sessions:

(1) How to publish with CreateSpace by the successful author and trainer, Alberta Sequeira;
(2) How to promote your work on social media by best-selling novelist and book marketer, Steven Manchester;
(3) How to pitch your work—preparation and videotaping by author, T.V. host/producer/director, Willie Pleasants.

Each of these sessions is critical to writers at stages in the journey of their work.

· Special Guests authors Terri Arthur, on the international publishing of her book (Fatal Decision: Edith Cavell WWI Nurse), and Priscilla E. Flint-Banks, memoir writer (I Look Back and Wonder How I Got Over), radio host, social activist, and marketer.

· AWB members Pat Perry and Joyce Keller Walsh will be available to speak with guests individually about genre-writing, as well as other writing, publishing, and promoting topics.
Cost is $35 per person; $25 for AWB members) $40 the day of.

By reservation only. Limit of 70 attendees. Please RSVP by April 1st you’re your choice of session to:Willieaweb@gmail.com (617) 282-5984.

Payment in advance may be via PayPal on our website: www.awb6.com

 

Drug Abuse & Heroin

January 2, 2017

National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit
April 17-20, 2017 | Atlanta

Law Enforcement Track Featured at National Summit!

On the frontlines in the nation’s battle against Rx drug and heroin abuse, law enforcement officials are tailoring their traditional and community policing techniques to fight the crimes specifically related to this epidemic. They also are taking on new roles in prevention and intervention of opioid abuse and overdoses. The Law Enforcement Track will feature real-world programs from the officers, prosecutors and partners who are implementing them. Two sessions will lay out the benefits and steps to building successful partnerships with public health and community organizations. A session devoted to pre-arrest diversion will showcase two programs that offer effective alternatives to incarceration in appropriate cases. The remaining sessions will cover PDMPs as investigative and probative tools, investigating and prosecuting drug-related homicides, and Rx drug diversion within a managed care organization.

 

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Alberta Sequeira

www.albertasequeira.wordpress.com

Email: alberta.sequeira@gmail.com

Teen Binge Drinking

December 20, 2016

 

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Alberta Sequeira

www.amazon.com/author/albertasequeira

Email: alberta.sequeira@gmail.com

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